Meaghan Delahunt

Meaghan Delahunt is a novelist and short story writer. Her work has been widely translated and her stories anthologised and broadcast on BBC Radio 4. In 1997 she won the Flamingo/HQ National Short Story Prize in Australia. Awards for her novels ‘In the Blue House’ (Bloomsbury, 2001), ‘The Red Book’ (Granta, 2008) and ‘To the Island’ (Granta, 2011) include a regional Commonwealth Prize, a Saltire Award and a nomination for the Orange Prize. ‘Greta Garbo’s Feet & Other Stories’ (Word Power Women, 2015) was longlisted for the Edgehill Short Story Prize 2016. Her latest novel is ‘The Night-Side of the Country’ ( UWAP, 2020)
Meaghan Delahunt - The Night Side of the Country

She has worked as a Creative Writing Tutor at the Prince & Princess of Wales Hospice in Glasgow and in 2017-19 was a Royal Literary Fund Fellow at the University of Dundee and Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh. She is part of the Royal Literary Fund Bridge Project in schools. She is a qualified Hatha Yoga and Yin Yoga teacher and founding member of Yoga for Bhopal. Born in Melbourne, Meaghan Delahunt has lived in Edinburgh since 1992.

Meaghan’s website: http://www.meaghandelahunt.com/

Meaghan Delahunt is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Jenny. For all enquiries contact jenny@jennybrownassociates.com

Books by Meaghan

To The Island
Granta, June 2011

Meaghan Delahunt - To the Island

He disappeared. That’s all she really knew. In search of her father Andreas, whom she has never met, Lena travels with her small son from Australia to Greece. On the island of Naxos she finds him, a wary, tormented man living in self-imposed exile and haunted by what happened to him under the rule of the Colonels in the 1960s. Slowly Lena unlocks the secrets of her father’s past, and in getting to know him begins to understand the dark realities of contemporary Greek history. To the Island is a book about the impact of larger political events on the lives of ordinary people, and how political and personal betrayals reverberate across generations, beautifully evoking the currents and cross-currents between individuals, within families and in broader society. And in Lena and Andreas’s stories, it shows how difficult it is to confront our personal and collective pasts – and the terrible consequences of being unable to do so.

Praise for To The Island

A wise and compassionate novel, beautifully written
The Times

It is a tale of recovery, of people who go through very bad things and then get better, in a limited and circumscribed way. It has more in common with a novel by Jean Rhys or Ernest Hemingway than the usual story of recovery… The writing is spare, sinewy; the mood goes from dark to a little less dark
The Financial Times

A powerful novel… There is a meditative, painterly quality to this novel, which reflect the way Delahunt, a practising Buddhist, writes and thinks
The Glasgow Herald

This is a novel of quietly intense physicality… Meaghan Delahunt explores the labyrinths of the human heart in a long awaited third novel
Scotland on Sunday

One of the things that lifts Meaghan Delahunt’s novels above the ordinary, besides her attentive and spiky prose, is her political interest… It may always be politics, or a political cause, that anchors Delahunt’s tales, but her mapping of the political onto the personal shows that she never forgets the human faces behind the banners
The Scotsman

Longlisted for the John D. Criticos Prize, London Hellenic Society

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11455072-to-the-island